Intelligent Futures is gearing up for a summer-long urban design experiment, alongside their colleagues at Blank Page Studio. Blank Page Studio, located on Kensington Crescent, is a creative and collaborative space, comprised of small innovative enterprises, from web developers and artists to urbanists and architects. Throughout the summer, the sidewalk space on the east side of the studio will transform into Blank Page Plaza, a dynamic and testable public place for passersby to play games, learn something new, or perhaps just sit down and stay awhile. This project will bring the collaboration and innovation that occurs in Blank Page Studio outdoors for the community to experience and enjoy.

Urban Field Testing

Temporary street design projects have been increasingly more popular over the past few years, with parklets taking over the streets of San Francisco and Vancouver, the book Tactical Urbanism getting swept off bookshelves all around the globe, and car-free, open street initiatives occurring more and more often in cities worldwide.

Short-term public interventions have the potential to create lasting, beneficial shifts within a city. By implementing quick and affordable changes, cities can prototype ideas and gain public feedback during the design process. Take Macon, Georgia as an example — in September 2016, an eight-mile long pop-up bike network was implemented. During this week long bike lane prototype, bicycle usage increased tenfold, demonstrating a demand for cycle paths. Permanent bike lanes have been built since the experiment and city policy in Macon now ensures that any roads being repaved must examine how bike lanes could be added to the existing structure.

First Intervention: The Moveable Chair

For our first intervention, we will create a pleasant place for people to sit and relax.  Public seating creates a useable, comfortable and pedestrian-oriented space, allowing folks to socialize, people-watch or just kick back and relax. Adding seating can be an easy and informal step to creating an active and lively space.

According to William H. Whyte, a late American urbanist and renowned people-observer, the best type of public seating is furniture that can move. Whyte considered the moveable chair “a wonderful invention” that provides people with choice: “a declaration of autonomy, to oneself, and rather satisfying.” Unlike fixed seats, moveable chairs give people the freedom to move closer or farther away from others, and follow or avoid the sun.

Watch this short clip from Whyte’s documentary “Social Life of Small Urban Places” to see how people in New York used chairs that move:

The risk of moveable furniture is that people may take the liberty of moving the chairs a bit too far away (perhaps onto their own patio or front yard at their house). We’re going to take a leap of faith and hope that our new furniture stays put without having to lock anything down. Stay tuned to hear about any thievery and what our next intervention will entail! Use the hashtag #blankpageplaza to follow the adventure on social media.